Browsing "Windows XP"

Windows Update Error 0xC80003FB

Click Start, select Run, type in: services.msc
then press enter
Now look for the Automatic Updates Service, right click it and choose to stop

Click Start, select Run, type in: %windir%SoftwareDistribution
then press enter
Open the Datastore folder and delete its contents.

Click Start, select Run, type in: type services.msc
then press enter
Now look again for the Automatic Update Service and choose to start

Try running the Updates again.

Can I still use Microsoft Virtual Server or Microsoft Virtual PC to test Windows Server 2008 clustering?

Virtual Server has commonly created a shared disk over the emulated SCSI controller to use for clustered storage. However, Server 2008 clustering doesn’t support parallel SCSI.

But there is light at the end of the tunnel. Server 2008 clustering supports the majority node set model, which means a cluster doesn’t need shared storage. Server 2008 can use node-voting with three nodes or more, or a file-share witness instead of the quorum disk for two-node clusters.

If you want shared storage, the easiest option is probably iSCSI because the iSCSI initiator is built into both Server 2008 and Windows Vista. For the iSCSI target, you may have access to an iSCSI SAN/device, a software solution such as Windows Storage Server, or an add-on iSCSI

Jul 25, 2007 - General, Scripting, Vista, Windows XP    2 Comments

How can I pre-cache the Microsoft Office 2007 installation files?

Office 2007 uses the MSOCACHE folder as part of its core installation and functionality process. The folder is typically populated during the Office 2007 installation. However, to avoid network activity during installation, you can accomplish a pre-cache by performing the following steps. (Use caret brackets in place of the square brackets.)

1. From the network installation point, use Notepad to open the config.xml file, which is located in the core product folder (e.g., Pro.WW for Office Professional 2007).
2. Find the [LIS] element, and uncomment the line by deleting the opening [!– and closing –] tags.
3. Set the [CACHEACTION] attribute to “CacheOnly”. The line in Config.xml should look like

[LIS CACHEACTION=”CacheOnly” /]

4. Save the config.xml file.
5. Run setup.exe on users’ computers, specifying the fully qualified path to the modified config.xml. For example,

\[server][share]Office12setup.exe /config
\[server][share]Office12Pro.WWConfig.xml

How can I prevent someone from accessing event logs on my server through the network?

Windows automatically limits access to the Security log to only those users who have the Manage auditing and security log user right. However, guests can access the System and Application logs. To disable guest access to these logs, open a Group Policy Object (GPO), go to ComputerConfigurationWindows SettingsSecurity SettingsEvent LogSettings for Event Logs, and enable Restrict guest access to system log and Restrict guest access to application. In Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP, these policies are named Prevent local guests group from accessing system log and Prevent local guests group from accessing application log, respectively. Other users will still be able to view these logs provided they possess the Access this computer from the network user right. Windows doesn’t offer a more granular way to control access to the logs.

When I open Windows Explorer, it takes a few seconds before it displays information. How can I eliminate that delay?

I fixed this problem by simply removing invalid entries from my system path. When Windows Explorer starts, it traverses the PATH variable, and invalid entries can extend the time necessary for Windows Explorer to initiate. To solve the problem, you need to ensure that each item in your PATH variable exists. To do so, open the Control Panel System applet, and access the Advanced settings (on the Advanced tab). Click the Environment Variables button. Under System Variables, view the PATH variable and check each entry that makes up the path. (Entries are separated by a semicolon.) Remove any incorrect entries, and click OK. Click OK on the main Environment Variables dialog box.

Jan 7, 2007 - General, Windows XP    2 Comments

Where is the Administrator account in Windows Vista?

By default, new Vista installations have the built-in Administrator account disabled with a blank password. If you want to enable the account, you need to set a strong password by using the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Computer Management snap-in and clearing the disable flag. It’s advisable to leave the Administrator account disabled, however, and use the Runas command to use Administrator privileges when required. If you log on as the Administrator account, then User Account Control (UAC) isn’t implemented and the session will have full privileges.

Where can I download Windows PowerShell?

On November 15, Microsoft released Windows PowerShell 1.0 (formerly codenamed Monad) for Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) and Windows Server 2003, which you can download at here . A Windows Vista Release Candidate 1 (RC1) version is also available, with the final Vista version available by January 31, 2007. The download is less than 2MB but does require that Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 is installed. Once PowerShell is installed, a new Programs group, Windows PowerShell 1.0, will be created, which has a number of shortcuts to documents and the actual Windows PowerShell application shortcut which points to the %SystemRoot%system32WindowsPowerShellv1.0powershell.exe image.

PowerShell is the future command-line and scripting environment for the management and automation of Windows environments, and many new Microsoft technologies have their management built on the PowerShell environment. For example, Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 relies heavily on the PowerShell environment for many management actions.

The base PowerShell also includes a number of command-line tools called cmdlets that allow access to many system resources such as accessing the registry, Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI), services, processes, event logs, and basically every part of the OS.

Common cmd.exe commands such as Dir and Type all work in the PowerShell, but its real power is via its improved cmdlets. To get started, it’s easiest to type

get-help

which opens an overview of the format of the PowerShell syntax and commands to get started. For example, the get-command command will display a list of all the cmdlets, and the get-command will display detailed information on that cmdlet.

Some handy commands to get started are get-service and get-process, which give information about services and processes, respectively. The figure shows a sample search for all processes that start with o:

In this example, the information is displayed in a table format, but you can easily output it to a list by passing format-list as it’s output, as the figure shows.

To get a list of all possible formats, type

get-help format*

at a command line.

How can I use Telnet to download an element of a Web page?

I recently wanted to download a file from a Web site without using a browser, just in raw text format. I used the Telnet command to perform the operations normally performed as part of the HTTP download process, which are essentially a series of GET commands. To initiate the connection, telnet to port 80 (instead of the default port 23) of the Web site, as the following example shows:

c:>telnet www.alibutt.com 80

Nothing will be displayed to screen. Type the GET command in uppercase letters:

GET /index.html (press enter twice)

The page will then be displayed in the command window, and the Telnet session will terminate. You might need to append “HTTP/1.0” at the end of the GET command (as the example below shows) depending on the Web server you’re connecting to. This tells the server which version of HTTP your client understands.

GET /index.html HTTP/1.0

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