Browsing "Exchange"
Dec 28, 2005 - Exchange, General, Windows 2003    No Comments

How do I remove my last Microsoft Exchange 5.5 Server installation from my Exchange Server 2003 organization?

Log on to the remaining Exchange 5.5 server and stop all services. The easiest way to do this is to stop the Exchange System Attendant by opening a command line and typing

net stop MSExchangeSA

You’ll see a warning that this command will stop other services, click Yes. After the command finishes running, run the command again (which will now stop the actual MSExchangeSA service).

# Log on to an Exchange 2003 server and start the Exchange 5.5 Administrator Console application (you must use the Exchange 5.5 version because Exchange 2003 tries to delete the Exchange server configuration from Active Directory–AD). Point the Exchange 5.5 Administrator Console to the Exchange 2003 server when prompted for a server.
# Expand the , Configuration, Servers node and select the Exchange 5.5 server in the right pane of the Exchange administration application. From the Edit menu select Delete. The application performs a check for resources; click Yes to any resources still found (assuming you know you’ve migrated everything you require). You might also see a warning that the MSFB and MS extensions could not be loaded. Click Ignore, then click OK to delete the confirmation message.
# Start the Exchange 2003 Exchange System Manager (ESM) and the Exchange 5.5 server will no longer be visible under the Servers container (, Administrative Groups, , Servers).
# You can now delete the Site Replication Service connection by opening the Tools, Site Replication Services node. Select the “Microsoft Exchange Site Replication Service ()” and select Delete from the Edit menu. Click Yes to the confirmation message.
# You can now raise the operational mode of the Exchange organization. Right-click the Exchange organization at the root of the node tree and select Properties. On the General tab click Change Mode, click Yes to the confirmation dialog box, then click OK to the main Properties dialog box
# Now you can remove the Active Directory Connector (ADC) connections. Start the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Active Directory Connector Services snap-in. Right-click each connection under the Active Directory Connector node and select Delete. You might receive a warning that the connection is the primary connection agreement (CA). Click OK and click Yes to the delete confirmation dialog box (You’ll usually have at least two connections–one user and one public folder).
# You can now uninstall the ADC tools and services from the server.

Can I disable the Message Transfer Agent (MTA) on Microsoft Exchange Server 2003?

Microsoft has changed its stance about disabling the MTA on Exchange Server 2003. In Exchange 2000 Server, you couldn’t disable the MTA, but because of limitations with the MTA in cluster environments and because its primary use is for communicating with Exchange 5.5 servers, Exchange 2003 lets you disable the MTA.
The main problem with maintaining the MTA is that in a cluster, only one Exchange Virtual Server hosts the MTA resource, which is responsible for all mail transportation to Exchange 5.5 servers or third-party connectors for all databases hosted on the entire cluster. But the MTA can communicate with only 50 databases (60 with a change to the system; see the Microsoft article “How to increase the number of databases that are supported by the MTA service when Exchange Server 5.5 coexists with a server cluster that is running Exchange Server 2003” here ). Because each node in a cluster can host 20 databases (five database over four storage groups), if you have more than three active nodes the MTA can’t communicate on behalf of all the databases in the cluster. For more information about disabling the MTA, see the Microsoft article “MTA Stacks service supportability guidelines for Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003” here
If you don’t require Exchange 5.5 communication or third-party connectors, and you want more than 60 databases in a cluster, you need to disable the MTA

Oct 27, 2005 - Exchange, General, Windows 2003    No Comments

My Microsoft Exchange Server database has reached its 16GB limit, and I can’t perform any actions to clear space. What can I do?

Microsoft added functionality in the Exchange 2000 Server post-Service Pack 3 (SP3) rollup to enable an extra 1GB of database growth for a standard edition database. You can use this extra space to perform maintenance in emergency situations when you run out of database space. This capability is standard with Exchange Server 2003. To access this additional storage, perform these steps:

1. Start the registry editor (regedit.exe) on the Exchange server.
2. Move to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesMSExchangeISSAVDALDC01Private-.
3. From the Edit menu select New – DWORD value.
4. Enter a name of Temporary DB Size Limit Extension and press enter.
5. Double-click the new value and set it to a value of 1. Click OK.
6. Close the registry editor. You should immediately perform the database maintenance to reduce its size, then delete the temporary size limit extension value.

As the name suggests, this extra space is temporary, and if you use up this 1GB you have no options left (except upgrade to Exchange 2003 SP2 or buy Exchange 2003 Enterprise Edition). You need to dismount and mount the Store for the change to take effect.

Why do 10 million people play World Of Warcraft ?

An excellent article on lesessais.com about the issues dealt with people trying to quit this game:

Here. Bear with me. Let me describe an emotional state, and you come up with the cause. First, emptiness. Emptiness like hunger, ravenous hunger; emptiness like the blackness that descends behind closed eyelids at the crepuscule before sleep; emptiness as need; emptiness as blind desire; emptiness visualized as a gaping hole where the heart once held court. Then, regret. Regret for loss, regret that the emptiness exists, regret that the memory of what once filled the hole—the heart, now, the heart, remember—lies dead and dies more each and every passing day; regret that the knowledge of what other people do to fill up their life has been lost along countless missteps and misspent hours trying to find the path on which you once, as a child, so deftly picked your way; regret that something is gone and has left an emptiness as deep as the blackest reaches of outer space. Anger, next. Anger that emptiness is remembered with regret; anger at the witless world that allowed such a gain that could become a loss that could be defined as emptiness with vast regret; anger that you, who once were so strong, so supple, so springboard-ready to bounce back to a mean emotional state, a psychical purpose, can see yourself suffering and maundering over the black heart, its regretful state, and your pointless rage. Despair, finally, that you will ever be another way.

Love, you say? If you did, and I hope you did, then you got it right, at least in purpose and point of origin, for though it smacks of the lovelorn puppy dog ministrations of a mooney-eyed lover, the emotional state I described was of an addict’s absence of soul, of spirit, of the will to experience. Which is to say, they are not all that different.

Unhealthy obsessions, selfish solipsism…the fables and myths that give us succor and teach us morals warn against anything so monomaniacal: it is hardly necessary to think of Narcissus to extend any story’s teleology to death by personal infirmity, moral laxity, or, quite simply, gazing too long at a mirrored self. Love, the quaint excuse for the angst-ridden teen’s outrageous outcries—the union of two souls! Death by dissolution! Not life, no, but bliss!—is seldom more than a mirror made to trick the viewer into seeing a better self. What of other mirrors? Other tricks? What of those that mask the truth but lightly, and in the dancing points of light you can see the fiction, the misdirection, life not lived but carefully avoided, painted in unearthly colors and brighter, happier, than even the most stunted man-child could ever want life to be? We could say that the infirmity is weaker, the morals ignored with more purpose and pain, the waters of immurement approached with more knowledge, dire knowledge, that it is death the soul seeks.

All this is pretty heavy-handed for someone talking of love. Still more for someone speaking of a video game. But there it is. Here. Where love once filled the hours of thousands of men and women who had nothing else to divert their attention away from the painful, plodding progress of life as we know it, we have a game. To be sure, there are other diversions, some do drugs, others take to drink, but for general amusement, for avoiding thinking, there have always been games and activities meant to satisfy other base yearnings—accomplishment, pride, mental facility, physical prowess, social adaptability—but no game quite like this…

Click here for full article and the source

Also ….
PICTURE: What will a World Of Warcraft player look like in the year 2030?

Jun 17, 2005 - Exchange, General    No Comments

Can you recover deleted items from a Microsoft Exchange Server public folder?

Yes, the same “Recover deleted items” option that’s available for a user mailbox is available for a public folder. However, unlike a mailbox, when you delete an item from a public folder, the item doesn’t go to a “Deleted items” folder. Instead, it’s simply hidden (by setting the PR_DELETED_ON property) and isn’t actually deleted until the “Deleted item retention” period on the public folder store has elapsed. You set the “Deleted item retention” option on public folders by selecting the public folder store in Exchange System Manager (ESM) and selecting Properties from the File menu. Set the “Keep deleted items for (days)” value to the number of days you want to save the contents of the “Deleted items” folder. Remember that if the public folder has replicas, you need to set the recovery time on each public store on each server. To recover an item, you must have Editor permissions on the folder (i.e., full Read, Write, and Delete permissions). Select the public folder from which the item was deleted and select “Recovery Deleted Items” from the Tools menu of the Microsoft Office Outlook client.

How can I send an email message from within a VBScript script?

If you have Microsoft IIS with SMTP installed on a server, you can use the following code to send a basic email message from within a script:

Set objMessage = CreateObject(“CDO.Message”)
objMessage.Subject = “Subject”
objMessage.Sender = “ali@alibutt.com”
objMessage.To = “you@yourself.com”
objMessage.TextBody = “test mail”
objMessage.Send

How Can I Move the Blackberry Administrator mailbox?

The administration mailbox is essential to the operation of the BlackBerry Enterprise Server because it holds critical information, such as the Server Relay Protocol (SRP) connectivity information, instance names and associated user lists.

To move the administration mailbox between mailbox stores or Exchange servers, complete the following steps:

1. In Services, on the BlackBerry Enterprise Server, stop the BlackBerry Enterprise Server service.
2. Move the administration mailbox to the new location. See your Microsoft Exchange Server Administration Guide for more information.

Note: You must be logged in to the BlackBerry Enterprise Server administration account to complete the following steps.

3. Update the Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) profiles on the BlackBerry Enterprise Server:
a. On the Start menu, click Programs > BlackBerry Enterprise Server > Edit the MAPI Profile for > BlackBerry Server .
b. Type your Exchange server name in the Microsoft Exchange server field.
c. Type your Mailbox name in the Mailbox field.

4. Run the Handheld Cleanup utility on the BlackBerry Enterprise Server:
a. Open a command prompt.
b. Change the directory to C:Program FilesResearch In MotionBlackBerry Enterprise ServerUtility.
c. Type the following command:

handheldcleanup –m

5. Press ENTER.
6. In Services, start the BlackBerry Enterprise Server service.

Dec 28, 2004 - Exchange, General    1 Comment

How can I determine whether my server is running Exchange Server 2003, Standard Edition, or Exchange 2003, Enterprise Edition?

If you have more than one storage group (SG), more than one message database, or if your database is greater than 16GB, you have Exchange 2003 Enterprise.

Another way to verify your Exchange Server edition is to open the Exchange Server Setup Progress.log file, which is located on the root of your system drive. Search for one of the following entries:

[16:53:50] Setup configuration information: — ID:xxxxx —
[16:53:50] This is a(n) Standard version of Microsoft Exchange Server
— ID:xxxxx–

or

[16:53:50] Setup configuration information: — ID:62227 —
[16:53:50] This is a(n) Enterprise version of Microsoft Exchange Server
— ID:62232 —

Jun 24, 2004 - Exchange    11 Comments

How can I recover Microsoft Office Outlook messages that have been removed by a hard delete?

You can perform a hard delete of a message by highlighting the message and pressing Shift+Del. Performing a hard delete removes the message without moving it to the Deleted Items folder. When you attempt to recover hard-deleted items, you’ll see that the hard-deleted messages aren’t listed in the recovery dialog box. If you select the folder from which you performed the hard delete (e.g., Inbox), you’ll see that the option to recover deleted items is grayed out on the Tools menu.

You can recover items that have been deleted from an Outlook folder–including hard-deleted items–either by performing the following steps or by adding the dumpster.reg entry to the registry. (You can download the dumpster.reg entry at dumpster.reg.)

1. Start the registry editor (regedit.exe).
2. Navigate to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftExchangeClientOptions subkey.
3. From the Edit menu, select New and click DWORD value.
4. Enter the name DumpsterAlwaysOn and press Enter.
5. Double-click the new value and set it to 1. Click OK.
6. Close the registry editor.

When you restart Outlook, the option to recover messages should be available for all folders.

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